Posts I Liked

romkids:

The Giant Eggs Of The Elephant Bird & Ostrich
The huge egg on the left belongs to the extinct Aepyornis (the legendary elephant bird) and is believed to be the largest ever bird egg. In fact, the egg of an Aepyornis can hold the volume of up to 160 chicken eggs! The smaller, but still sizeable, egg on the right belongs to an ostrich, the living record holder. An ostrich egg can fit the volume of upwards of 24 chicken eggs. In comparison, the smallest bird egg belongs to the bee hummingbird of which 4700 of their eggs would fit into an ostrich’s.
The penny gives you an idea of the size of these huge eggs. Up until the discovery of the eggs of the dinosaur Hypselosaurus (which is still up for debate), Aepyornis eggs were the unchallenged largest eggs ever attributed to a land animal. 
The Aepyornis egg you see above is a reproduction, and while there are a few real specimens in collections around the world they are exceeding rare, and have been sold at auction for over $100,000!
More information
The Telegraph: David Attenborough and the mystery of the elephant bird
Learn more about ornithology from ROM scientist Mark Peck on Twitter!
Written by @kironcmukherjee. Last update: April 19th, 2014.

Just in time Easter… The ROM is still holding out on revealing the mysterious bunny egg though.

romkids:

The Giant Eggs Of The Elephant Bird & Ostrich

The huge egg on the left belongs to the extinct Aepyornis (the legendary elephant bird) and is believed to be the largest ever bird egg. In fact, the egg of an Aepyornis can hold the volume of up to 160 chicken eggs! The smaller, but still sizeable, egg on the right belongs to an ostrich, the living record holder. An ostrich egg can fit the volume of upwards of 24 chicken eggs. In comparison, the smallest bird egg belongs to the bee hummingbird of which 4700 of their eggs would fit into an ostrich’s.

The penny gives you an idea of the size of these huge eggs. Up until the discovery of the eggs of the dinosaur Hypselosaurus (which is still up for debate), Aepyornis eggs were the unchallenged largest eggs ever attributed to a land animal. 

The Aepyornis egg you see above is a reproduction, and while there are a few real specimens in collections around the world they are exceeding rare, and have been sold at auction for over $100,000!

More information

Written by @kironcmukherjee. Last update: April 19th, 2014.

Just in time Easter… The ROM is still holding out on revealing the mysterious bunny egg though.

Won a game of Hearthstone from fatigue!

My lightwell was keeping me alive while his auctioneer was slowly killing him with his few remaining cards in his hand. I was about to concede when he forgot he had wind furied his 4/4 so I tossed my mind blast and then ended my turn to claim victory.

Weird match.

Won a game of Hearthstone from fatigue!

My lightwell was keeping me alive while his auctioneer was slowly killing him with his few remaining cards in his hand. I was about to concede when he forgot he had wind furied his 4/4 so I tossed my mind blast and then ended my turn to claim victory.

Weird match.

chroniclesofamber:

Cyber-Dys-Punk-Topia

“There was a place near an airport, Kowloon, when Hong Kong wasn’t China, but there had been a mistake, a long time ago, and that place, very small, many people, it still belonged to China. So there was no law there. An outlaw place. And more and more people crowded in; they built it up, higher. No rules, just building, just people living. Police wouldn’t go there. Drugs and whores and gambling. But people living, too. Factories, restaurants. A city. No laws.

William Gibson, Idoru

It was the most densely populated place on Earth for most of the 20th century, where a room cost the equivalent of US$6 per month in high rise buildings that belonged to no country. In this urban enclave, “a historical accident”, law had no place. Drug dealers, pimps and prostitutes lived and worked alongside kindergartens, and residents walked the narrow alleys with umbrellas to shield themselves from the endless, constant dripping of makeshift water pipes above….

Kowloon ‘Walled’ City lost its wall during the Second World War when Japan invaded and razed the walls for materials to expand the nearby airport. When Japan surrendered, claims of sovereignty over Kowloon finally came to a head between the Chinese and the British. Perhaps to avoid triggering yet another conflict in the wake of a world war, both countries wiped their hands of the burgeoning territory.

And then came the refugees, the squatters, the outlaws. The uncontrolled building of 300 interconnected towers crammed into a seven-acre plot of land had begun and by 1990, Kowloon was home to more than 50,000 inhabitants….

Despite earning its Cantonese nickname, “City of Darkness”, amazingly, many of Kowloon’s residents liked living there. And even with its lack of basic amenities such as sanitation, safety and even sunlight, it’s reported that many have fond memories of the friendly tight-knit community that was “poor but happy”.

“People who lived there were always loyal to each other. In the Walled City, the sunshine always followed the rain,” a former resident told the South China Morning Post….

Today all that remains of Kowloon is a bronze small-scale model of the labyrinth in the middle a public park where it once stood.

This isn’t to say places like Kowloon Walled City no longer exist in Hong Kong….

— from Anywhere But Here: Kowloon “Anarchy” City

(via imaginemusicalcoloursofthewind)

lifemadesimple:

50 Incredible Facts About Skin

Did you know that your skin is considered an organ? Or that every 28 days the skin renews itself? These fact and more can be found on the 50 Incredible Facts About Skin infographic brought to you by Beautyflash. You can learn general facts about the skin as well as what you need to keep healthy skin.

No thanks. I’m trying to cut down.

Mr. Garibaldi encounters some alternative cuisine in the Zocalo in “A Long Dark” from season 2.  He declines the Drazi’s offer of sharing the live tentacle food with a “No thanks.  I’m trying to cut down.”  “Save me some dessert” he adds as he is called away to deal with Amis.

san nak ji (산낙지) in 2259.


astronauts who live in space for extended periods of time are at risk for developing solipsism syndrome- “a psychological state in which a person feels that the world is not external to his or her mind.”


"I’m the president of the world council of soliphists"

astronauts who live in space for extended periods of time are at risk for developing solipsism syndrome- “a psychological state in which a person feels that the world is not external to his or her mind.”

"I’m the president of the world council of soliphists"

(via unbelievable-facts)

vizual-statistix:

These maps show the geographic distribution of class A, B, and C IP addresses. The left-hand maps show point locations, while those on the right display kernel densities.  Because points can be co-located, some high-density locations only appear on the kernel density maps. 
There are some interesting differences between the maps, particularly in Brazil, Australia, and parts of Western Europe. There is also a bright yellow spot on the kernel density maps just northwest of Lake Bakal in Russia. At that location, tens of thousands of IP addresses are all located at a very specific latitude/longitude.
Data source: http://dev.maxmind.com/geoip/geoip2/geolite2/

Where in the world is the internet?  Check out this visualization of IP addresses and their lat/lons.
The post mentions a bright spot near Lake Baikal in Russia, but I noticed a bright spot near Churchhill Manitoba which looked like on the same latitude, but it is 5degrees different… reminds me of that display at the Science & Tech Museum in Ottawa that mentions some of the rocket research done there in the 50s… guess there is still a bunch of government action up north with the polar bears…?
Would be interesting to over-lay it with population densities and see where there are a lot of people without IP addresses?

vizual-statistix:

These maps show the geographic distribution of class A, B, and C IP addresses. The left-hand maps show point locations, while those on the right display kernel densities.  Because points can be co-located, some high-density locations only appear on the kernel density maps. 

There are some interesting differences between the maps, particularly in Brazil, Australia, and parts of Western Europe. There is also a bright yellow spot on the kernel density maps just northwest of Lake Bakal in Russia. At that location, tens of thousands of IP addresses are all located at a very specific latitude/longitude.

Data source: http://dev.maxmind.com/geoip/geoip2/geolite2/

Where in the world is the internet?  Check out this visualization of IP addresses and their lat/lons.

The post mentions a bright spot near Lake Baikal in Russia, but I noticed a bright spot near Churchhill Manitoba which looked like on the same latitude, but it is 5degrees different… reminds me of that display at the Science & Tech Museum in Ottawa that mentions some of the rocket research done there in the 50s… guess there is still a bunch of government action up north with the polar bears…?

Would be interesting to over-lay it with population densities and see where there are a lot of people without IP addresses?

What happened to the follow and reblog buttons at the upper right side of every tumblr page?

Asked by chickennobreast

codeit:

It looks like they’re still there! Sometimes tumblr’s servers can slow down or even not work occasionally, so that may have been the case at the time you “noticed” this scary situation. It’s okay though. Everything is as it was. The Internet is safe once again!

I have seen them at the bottom of the page instead, and figured it was a theme setting. One page that had them at the bottom had some music player also at the bottom that obscured them.